Why does the pH on a safety data sheet (SDS) for some standards not match the certificate of analysis (COA)?

Document ID

Document ID TE7708

Version

Version 4.0

Status

Status Published

Published Date

Published Date 03/19/2019
Question
Why does the pH on a safety data sheet (SDS) for some standards not match the certificate of analysis (COA)?
Summary
Discrepancy between pH listed on SDS and actual pH.
Answer
The pH listed on an SDS for some standards, like Calcium Standard Solution, 100 mg/L as Ca (NIST), 500 mL (Product # 4457649), is correct, even though the measured pH value is not reflected on the SDS.

The two tests performed in production controls for a particular standard standard are concentration (example: 100 ± 1 mg/L as Ca2+) and pH (example: pH 1.0-4.5).
 
These control specifications are also reflected on the COA for each lot of standard. The COA also provides the actual concentration and pH of that specific lot of standard when the production controls were performed.
 
So although the pH of a specific lot of standard isn't necessarily 1.0, the pH can be as low as 1.0. Therefore the SDS is correct and reflects how the product should be approached in terms of what the SDS covers such as handling, disposal, and safety concern. The extreme scenario is assumed, even if the pH isn't actually that low.

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